Werner's Blog — Opinion, Analysis, Commentary
Electoral participation in Canada

When voters went to the polls on October 19, 2015, they did so in higher numbers than in several previous elections. Elections Canada reports voter turnout for every election since 1867. In 2015, 68.5% of eligible voters cast a ballot, up from 58.8% in 2008 and 61.1% in 2011. This is an encouraging sign that the downword trend in voter participation can be broken. However, the national average masks large differences across the regions. The histogram below shows the distribution of participation rates across all ridings in Canada in 2015.

Distribution of Participation Rates, Canadian Federal Election 2015

click on image for high-resolution PDF version

Towards the end of this blog a table shows the participation rate for each riding in descending order of participation rate. Two ridings in Quebec had the highest participation rate, both over 85%. Quebec also holds the record for the lowest participation rate in 2015. In Saint-Léonard Saint-Michel less than 50% of eligible voters turned out to vote.

What explains the large variation in participation rates across ridings in Canada? The answer is unfortunately: nothing obvious. One notion is that turnout is higher in ridings that are contested narrowly. However, regressing the participation rate on the winning margin (the percent-point gap between the front-runner and runner-up) shows a statistically insignificant result.

Population density is only weakly related to voter turnout. One might assume that it is easier to reach polling stations in densely-populatd urban ridings than in sparsely-populated rural ridings. That does indeed show up significantly in statistical terms, but perhaps with a somewhat non-intuitive pattern. Voter turnout is indeed about 5 percentage-points (pp) lower in the most sparsely populated ridings. There is slightly higher voter turnout than average for the mid-range ridings (up to +2pp) in terms of population density, and it is again lower in the most urban rdings (by as much as -2pp). The pattern looks a bit like an inverted "U".

Party preference correlates somewhat with voter turnout. Voter turnout is about 0.37pp higher for each extra 10pp share of conservative voters. In other words, a riding with a 75% share of conservative voters has a 1.85pp higher voter turnout than a riding with a 25% share of conservative voters. This is a relatively small magnitude. There is no similar effect for the vote shares of the other major parties; estimates for other parties are all insignificant statistically. Overall, the effects of population density and party preference explain no more than 5% of the variation in the data that you see in the histogram above.

So what else can explain the variation in voter turnout? The answer must be demographics. It has been widely documented that age composition has a strong effect on turnout: older voter are more likely to vote than younger voters. An Elections Canda report, voter turnout by age group and gender at the 2011 federal general election, documents this "age gradient" in voter turnout. There are also reports about why voter turnout is lower among First Nations. Canadian political scientist André Blais has studied voter turnout patterns across countries and over time. In his 2006 research survey What affects voter turnout? he concludes:

Cross-national studies of turnout have produced a number of robust findings. We can confidently say that turnout is lower in poor countries and higher in small ones, that compulsory voting fosters turnout, and that turnout increases in closely contested elections. [However, we] have a poor understanding of how compulsory voting enhances turnout, and we have a poor appreciation of how much or little competition matters and of how it plays out in [proportional representation] systems. It makes sense to believe that turnout is lower in less salient elections but what makes an election more or less salient is still obscure.

Because our understanding of what drives voter turnout remains poor, it also remains difficult to find ways to increase voter turnout. How do we make an election more salient? In the October 2015 election, there was a mood for change: evicting the incumbent government was a potent motivation for many voters. But such conditions will not exist for every election, nor should they.

Where demographics points to low voter participation, as for young voters and for aboriginal communities, we need to ask what is driving this low turnout. Is it apathy? Is it political disengagement? Is it simply a life-cycle path that older voters care more about politics, or have more at stake financially, when they flock to the polls in larger numbers?

What encouraged me most about engaging young voters is what took place across many schools in Canada. It was reported that more than 850,000 underage voters cast mock ballots in more than 6,000 schools in the national Student Vote program run by Civix, a non-partisan registered charity that educates schoolage children about elections. As Chris Hannay reported in the Globe and Mail on October 20, the student vote was quite in tune with the actual election results: Mock election reveals students would have voted in Liberals. To the people at Civix and the many teachers across all of Canada who promoted the student-vote elections, I send a big Thank-You. Educating our children about the importance of elections is a crucial step in securing the future of our democracy. My 9-year old son participatd proudly in the mock elections. At his International Baccalaureate elementary school in Vancouver, elections were a "unit of inquiry". The student vote turned the federal election into a teachable moment.

For the benefit of our children, perhaps we need more frequent elections. But then again, our neighbours in the United States get to vote every two years, and that does not seem to help much. In the 2014 elections for the House of Representatives voter turnout was a paltry 36.4%. Time magazine reported it as Voter Turnout in Midterm Elections Hits 72-Year Low. This turnout is an embarrassment for a country that considers itself as one of the international guardians of democracy. Canada and the United States can do better. I think Civix got it right: if we want voter turnout to improve, we need to start with our kids.

* * *

PvIdRiding Popu-
lation
ElectorsVoters Partici-
pation
Rate
QC 24067 Saint-Jean 93,842  69,078  60,386  87.4% 
QC 24045 Louis-Saint-Laurent 94,766  75,030  64,683  86.2% 
SK 47010 Saskatoon–Grasswood 76,704  55,886  46,086  82.5% 
ON 35075 Ottawa Centre 113,619  91,625  75,500  82.4% 
ON 35076 Orléans 119,247  96,174  77,988  81.1% 
ON 35088 Carleton 89,522  73,418  59,239  80.7% 
NB 13002 Beauséjour 80,416  66,170  52,936  80.0% 
AB 48032 Sherwood Park–Fort Saskatchewan 105,162  83,841  66,686  79.5% 
BC 59027 Saanich–Gulf Islands 104,285  85,839  68,140  79.4% 
ON 35041 Kanata–Carleton 100,846  79,831  63,323  79.3% 
PE 11004 Malpeque 35,039  28,556  22,472  78.7% 
QC 24048 Mirabel 95,095  75,521  59,418  78.7% 
QC 24058 Portneuf–Jacques-Cartier 96,525  79,157  62,059  78.4% 
ON 35064 Nepean 104,775  82,976  64,888  78.2% 
PE 11001 Cardigan 36,005  28,777  22,485  78.1% 
QC 24074 Vaudreuil–Soulanges 106,322  84,298  65,528  77.7% 
BC 59041 Victoria 110,942  92,574  71,895  77.7% 
YT 60001 Yukon 33,897  26,283  20,291  77.2% 
NB 13003 Fredericton 81,759  60,587  46,722  77.1% 
PE 11003 Egmont 34,598  27,751  21,362  77.0% 
BC 59010 Cowichan–Malahat–Langford 99,160  80,298  61,778  76.9% 
BC 59009 Courtenay–Alberni 110,391  90,998  69,849  76.8% 
MB 46014 Winnipeg South Centre 90,711  69,799  53,571  76.8% 
QC 24064 Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie 96,082  76,162  58,335  76.6% 
NB 13001 Acadie–Bathurst 79,340  66,594  50,963  76.5% 
BC 59021 North Vancouver 109,639  84,093  64,354  76.5% 
ON 35112 Waterloo 103,192  78,527  59,849  76.2% 
QC 24060 Repentigny 103,897  85,652  65,211  76.1% 
SK 47011 Saskatoon–University 72,010  58,810  44,773  76.1% 
BC 59018 Nanaimo–Ladysmith 114,998  93,578  71,241  76.1% 
BC 59026 Esquimalt–Saanich–Sooke 113,004  89,523  68,081  76.0% 
PE 11002 Charlottetown 34,562  27,891  21,165  75.9% 
ON 35078 Ottawa–Vanier 110,999  83,570  63,355  75.8% 
ON 35079 Ottawa West–Nepean 111,881  83,195  62,913  75.6% 
ON 35110 University–Rosedale 98,605  73,963  55,925  75.6% 
MB 46013 Winnipeg South 85,540  63,798  48,199  75.5% 
NB 13006 Miramichi–Grand Lake 59,343  48,158  36,364  75.5% 
QC 24014 Pierre-Boucher–Les Patriotes–Verchères 95,326  78,738  59,390  75.4% 
SK 47009 Regina–Wascana 77,208  56,656  42,723  75.4% 
AB 48005 Calgary Confederation 111,785  88,854  66,808  75.2% 
ON 35031 Glengarry–Prescott–Russell 106,240  85,388  64,173  75.2% 
QC 24038 Laurentides–Labelle 107,034  84,142  63,173  75.1% 
BC 59037 North Island–Powell River 103,458  80,730  60,536  75.0% 
BC 59011 Delta 100,588  74,267  55,689  75.0% 
SK 47007 Regina–Lewvan 79,587  63,894  47,834  74.9% 
ON 35081 Parkdale–High Park 105,103  78,241  58,567  74.9% 
NB 13004 Fundy Royal 79,331  62,713  46,820  74.7% 
ON 35077 Ottawa South 121,894  86,708  64,649  74.6% 
BC 59030 South Surrey–White Rock 94,678  76,078  56,631  74.4% 
MB 46009 Saint Boniface–Saint Vital 84,353  65,626  48,823  74.4% 
QC 24036 Lac-Saint-Louis 105,317  83,824  62,312  74.3% 
BC 59013 Kamloops–Thompson–Cariboo 118,618  93,877  69,765  74.3% 
NS 12005 Halifax 92,643  71,363  53,032  74.3% 
MB 46002 Charleswood–St. James–Assiniboia–Headingley 81,864  63,466  47,157  74.3% 
BC 59042 West Vancouver–Sunshine Coast–Sea to Sky Country 112,875  89,459  66,458  74.3% 
NS 12002 Central Nova 74,597  59,585  44,263  74.3% 
AB 48022 Foothills 105,515  82,380  60,986  74.0% 
ON 35038 Hamilton West–Ancaster–Dundas 109,535  84,350  62,279  73.8% 
NB 13008 New Brunswick Southwest 66,197  51,376  37,926  73.8% 
BC 59015 Kootenay–Columbia 107,589  85,653  63,206  73.8% 
AB 48012 Calgary Signal Hill 109,647  84,765  62,519  73.8% 
ON 35053 London West 119,090  92,326  68,027  73.7% 
ON 35090 Toronto–St. Paul's 103,983  77,433  56,972  73.6% 
ON 35101 Spadina–Fort York 82,480  74,958  55,148  73.6% 
ON 35068 Niagara West 86,533  68,937  50,657  73.5% 
BC 59029 South Okanagan–West Kootenay 112,096  90,694  66,594  73.4% 
ON 35072 Oakville 119,649  88,179  64,703  73.4% 
NB 13005 Madawaska–Restigouche 62,540  50,871  37,306  73.3% 
ON 35015 Burlington 120,569  95,624  70,100  73.3% 
BC 59016 Langley–Aldergrove 103,084  81,812  59,896  73.2% 
ON 35086 Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke 102,537  78,080  57,159  73.2% 
QC 24053 Notre-Dame-de-Grâce–Westmount 100,916  70,559  51,593  73.1% 
ON 35044 Kingston and the Islands 116,996  89,990  65,772  73.1% 
AB 48001 Banff–Airdrie 105,442  91,222  66,638  73.1% 
SK 47005 Moose Jaw–Lake Centre–Lanigan 76,106  57,471  41,965  73.0% 
AB 48019 Edmonton Strathcona 103,183  76,160  55,604  73.0% 
SK 47004 Carlton Trail–Eagle Creek 72,607  55,048  40,179  73.0% 
ON 35084 Peterborough–Kawartha 115,269  91,180  66,542  73.0% 
QC 24042 Lévis–Lotbinière 104,366  85,766  62,588  73.0% 
ON 35032 Guelph 121,688  95,761  69,868  73.0% 
QC 24011 Beloeil–Chambly 109,955  91,068  66,438  73.0% 
NB 13007 Moncton–Riverview–Dieppe 89,484  71,350  52,041  72.9% 
AB 48008 Calgary Midnapore 111,227  87,158  63,562  72.9% 
ON 35007 Beaches–East York 107,084  76,173  55,530  72.9% 
AB 48007 Calgary Heritage 108,320  80,213  58,430  72.8% 
AB 48002 Battle River–Crowfoot 107,140  80,698  58,769  72.8% 
BC 59022 Pitt Meadows–Maple Ridge 94,111  71,682  52,150  72.8% 
BC 59020 North Okanagan–Shuswap 121,474  96,243  69,954  72.7% 
ON 35049 Lanark–Frontenac–Kingston 98,409  78,826  57,240  72.6% 
ON 35040 Huron–Bruce 104,842  80,355  58,245  72.5% 
AB 48010 Calgary Rocky Ridge 108,901  87,323  63,292  72.5% 
ON 35021 Don Valley West 99,820  70,524  51,086  72.4% 
AB 48033 Sturgeon River–Parkland 105,733  84,952  61,537  72.4% 
ON 35052 London North Centre 118,079  88,819  64,271  72.4% 
ON 35042 Kenora 55,977  42,548  30,752  72.3% 
ON 35091 Sarnia–Lambton 106,293  80,565  58,125  72.1% 
AB 48004 Calgary Centre 108,931  84,960  61,249  72.1% 
BC 59014 Kelowna–Lake Country 110,051  89,033  64,155  72.1% 
ON 35109 Toronto–Danforth 104,017  77,158  55,581  72.0% 
ON 35024 Eglinton–Lawrence 113,150  77,463  55,792  72.0% 
SK 47013 Souris–Moose Mountain 72,058  52,093  37,516  72.0% 
QC 24061 Richmond–Arthabaska 102,816  81,429  58,617  72.0% 
BC 59005 Central Okanagan–Similkameen–Nicola 104,398  86,093  61,973  72.0% 
SK 47002 Cypress Hills–Grasslands 67,834  50,426  36,207  71.8% 
QC 24043 Longueuil–Saint-Hubert 104,038  81,109  58,199  71.8% 
AB 48029 Red Deer–Mountain View 110,793  86,737  62,212  71.7% 
ON 35108 Toronto Centre 93,971  70,578  50,602  71.7% 
NS 12008 Sackville–Preston–Chezzetcook 85,583  67,401  48,301  71.7% 
NS 12004 Dartmouth–Cole Harbour 91,212  73,066  52,270  71.5% 
BC 59017 Mission–Matsqui–Fraser Canyon 90,871  62,486  44,651  71.5% 
NS 12006 Halifax West 87,275  70,089  50,079  71.5% 
QC 24076 Trois-Rivières 103,070  84,387  60,289  71.4% 
ON 35071 Northumberland–Peterborough South 107,840  89,128  63,609  71.4% 
NS 12003 Cumberland–Colchester 82,321  64,923  46,332  71.4% 
QC 24057 Pontiac 104,394  87,782  62,625  71.3% 
AB 48018 Edmonton Riverbend 106,302  80,938  57,740  71.3% 
NB 13010 Tobique–Mactaquac 70,632  53,870  38,427  71.3% 
NS 12001 Cape Breton–Canso 75,247  60,666  43,237  71.3% 
ON 35050 Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes 99,306  79,195  56,436  71.3% 
MB 46006 Kildonan–St. Paul 81,794  61,604  43,875  71.2% 
AB 48030 Red Deer–Lacombe 113,693  86,609  61,662  71.2% 
ON 35113 Wellington–Halton Hills 115,880  89,653  63,812  71.2% 
ON 35073 Oakville North–Burlington 114,378  85,462  60,796  71.1% 
AB 48034 Yellowhead 98,855  73,996  52,525  71.0% 
BC 59039 Vancouver Quadra 102,416  74,633  52,972  71.0% 
QC 24013 Thérèse-De Blainville 98,499  79,347  56,248  70.9% 
BC 59002 Burnaby North–Seymour 100,632  74,071  52,480  70.9% 
ON 35027 Etobicoke Centre 114,910  87,440  61,802  70.7% 
BC 59006 Chilliwack–Hope 92,734  71,703  50,661  70.7% 
BC 59001 Abbotsford 96,819  68,154  48,124  70.6% 
QC 24004 Alfred-Pellan 98,045  78,288  55,169  70.5% 
ON 35030 Flamborough–Glanbrook 97,081  78,865  55,510  70.4% 
QC 24030 Hull–Aylmer 103,447  78,773  55,440  70.4% 
NS 12007 Kings–Hants 83,306  66,454  46,686  70.3% 
ON 35114 Whitby 122,022  91,891  64,516  70.2% 
BC 59007 Cloverdale–Langley City 100,318  77,044  54,075  70.2% 
ON 35028 Etobicoke–Lakeshore 115,437  92,100  64,508  70.0% 
QC 24034 La Prairie 99,811  82,318  57,572  69.9% 
ON 35048 Lambton–Kent–Middlesex 105,919  80,666  56,363  69.9% 
SK 47006 Prince Albert 79,344  56,563  39,510  69.9% 
ON 35106 Thunder Bay–Superior North 82,827  63,995  44,608  69.7% 
QC 24071 Salaberry–Suroît 107,538  88,355  61,535  69.6% 
NS 12009 South Shore–St. Margarets 92,561  75,904  52,775  69.5% 
ON 35046 Kitchener–Conestoga 93,827  68,623  47,699  69.5% 
BC 59023 Port Moody–Coquitlam 108,326  78,693  54,667  69.5% 
AB 48021 Edmonton–Wetaskiwin 110,644  98,502  68,344  69.4% 
QC 24049 Montarville 99,518  83,532  57,917  69.3% 
SK 47008 Regina–Qu'Appelle 72,891  53,204  36,883  69.3% 
ON 35103 Sudbury 92,048  71,594  49,629  69.3% 
MB 46008 Provencher 88,640  64,598  44,745  69.3% 
AB 48026 Lethbridge 105,999  82,225  56,943  69.3% 
MB 46010 Selkirk–Interlake–Eastman 91,463  71,331  49,363  69.2% 
AB 48025 Lakeland 104,616  79,334  54,779  69.0% 
NB 13009 Saint John–Rothesay 82,129  61,236  42,281  69.0% 
ON 35097 Scarborough–Rouge Park 102,646  71,950  49,655  69.0% 
ON 35070 Nipissing–Timiskaming 90,996  70,820  48,875  69.0% 
QC 24016 Brome–Missisquoi 98,616  85,051  58,675  69.0% 
ON 35085 Pickering–Uxbridge 109,344  85,794  59,159  69.0% 
QC 24019 Charlesbourg–Haute-Saint-Charles 103,331  84,596  58,256  68.9% 
ON 35092 Sault Ste. Marie 82,052  63,555  43,757  68.8% 
ON 35018 Davenport 102,360  72,082  49,584  68.8% 
ON 35006 Bay of Quinte 109,488  83,954  57,713  68.7% 
QC 24027 Gatineau 106,424  84,097  57,800  68.7% 
ON 35057 Milton 88,065  71,754  49,308  68.7% 
ON 35025 Elgin–Middlesex–London 110,109  82,892  56,933  68.7% 
ON 35023 Durham 115,395  93,455  64,185  68.7% 
ON 35061 Mississauga–Lakeshore 118,893  86,308  59,273  68.7% 
ON 35014 Bruce–Grey–Owen Sound 106,475  82,056  56,333  68.7% 
BC 59028 Skeena–Bulkley Valley 90,586  63,459  43,564  68.6% 
BC 59004 Cariboo–Prince George 108,252  78,356  53,734  68.6% 
AB 48011 Calgary Shepard 110,296  96,769  66,351  68.6% 
NS 12010 Sydney–Victoria 73,328  59,761  40,974  68.6% 
BC 59033 Surrey–Newton 105,183  64,798  44,424  68.6% 
ON 35039 Hastings–Lennox and Addington 92,528  72,641  49,797  68.6% 
NL 10006 St. John's East 81,936  65,499  44,880  68.5% 
QC 24017 Brossard–Saint-Lambert 100,828  83,587  57,260  68.5% 
AB 48014 Edmonton Centre 106,121  78,131  53,512  68.5% 
NS 12011 West Nova 83,654  66,796  45,679  68.4% 
ON 35054 Markham–Stouffville 109,780  87,460  59,773  68.3% 
QC 24021 Châteauguay–Lacolle 92,169  75,924  51,782  68.2% 
SK 47014 Yorkton–Melville 71,270  53,694  36,613  68.2% 
ON 35089 St. Catharines 110,596  84,474  57,591  68.2% 
QC 24023 Compton–Stanstead 101,946  81,867  55,811  68.2% 
ON 35080 Oxford 108,656  83,431  56,850  68.1% 
ON 35083 Perth–Wellington 104,912  76,097  51,851  68.1% 
SK 47003 Desnethé–Missinippi–Churchill River 69,471  44,320  30,191  68.1% 
ON 35045 Kitchener Centre 102,433  76,797  52,280  68.1% 
MB 46001 Brandon–Souris 83,814  60,427  41,106  68.0% 
BC 59036 Vancouver Granville 99,886  79,154  53,824  68.0% 
BC 59024 Prince George–Peace River–Northern Rockies 107,382  76,312  51,859  68.0% 
ON 35065 Newmarket–Aurora 109,457  83,108  56,464  67.9% 
ON 35034 Haliburton–Kawartha Lakes–Brock 110,182  91,208  61,834  67.8% 
ON 35082 Parry Sound–Muskoka 91,263  75,642  51,279  67.8% 
ON 35033 Haldimand–Norfolk 108,051  82,621  55,990  67.8% 
QC 24010 Bellechasse–Les Etchemins–Lévis 112,385  92,420  62,598  67.7% 
ON 35099 Simcoe–Grey 116,307  97,145  65,747  67.7% 
SK 47001 Battlefords–Lloydminster 70,034  49,763  33,678  67.7% 
ON 35098 Scarborough Southwest 106,733  72,164  48,766  67.6% 
QC 24050 Montcalm 97,261  78,489  53,009  67.5% 
QC 24065 Marc-Aurèle-Fortin 99,629  80,787  54,525  67.5% 
QC 24072 Shefford 107,988  87,299  58,920  67.5% 
AB 48017 Edmonton Mill Woods 106,103  73,323  49,481  67.5% 
ON 35069 Nickel Belt 90,962  72,828  49,113  67.4% 
ON 35102 Stormont–Dundas–South Glengarry 100,913  78,706  53,066  67.4% 
ON 35063 Mississauga–Streetsville 118,757  83,122  55,999  67.4% 
AB 48020 Edmonton West 104,422  79,446  53,457  67.3% 
ON 35060 Mississauga–Erin Mills 117,199  82,348  55,347  67.2% 
ON 35005 Barrie–Springwater–Oro-Medonte 97,876  75,207  50,531  67.2% 
ON 35104 Thornhill 110,427  81,106  54,491  67.2% 
BC 59008 Coquitlam–Port Coquitlam 110,277  84,120  56,511  67.2% 
QC 24063 Rivière-du-Nord 106,293  84,403  56,657  67.1% 
ON 35105 Thunder Bay–Rainy River 82,984  62,773  42,083  67.0% 
QC 24044 Louis-Hébert 106,888  92,119  61,744  67.0% 
QC 24003 Ahuntsic-Cartierville 110,473  82,948  55,567  67.0% 
BC 59034 Vancouver Centre 102,480  86,663  58,048  67.0% 
BC 59035 Vancouver East 110,097  87,657  58,708  67.0% 
QC 24056 Pierrefonds–Dollard 106,499  87,365  58,505  67.0% 
NL 10007 St. John's South–Mount Pearl 81,944  66,936  44,801  66.9% 
AB 48009 Calgary Nose Hill 109,286  81,582  54,562  66.9% 
ON 35118 York Centre 100,277  64,297  42,944  66.8% 
ON 35009 Brampton East 99,712  67,721  45,206  66.8% 
AB 48031 St. Albert–Edmonton 111,541  88,876  59,208  66.6% 
ON 35001 Ajax 109,600  84,584  56,307  66.6% 
AB 48003 Bow River 103,871  75,146  49,988  66.5% 
BC 59019 New Westminster–Burnaby 108,652  79,176  52,642  66.5% 
QC 24039 Laurier–Sainte-Marie 103,053  82,297  54,681  66.4% 
ON 35066 Niagara Centre 105,860  82,305  54,682  66.4% 
QC 24009 Bécancour–Nicolet–Saurel 93,779  78,607  52,205  66.4% 
ON 35019 Don Valley East 93,007  62,682  41,588  66.3% 
MB 46007 Portage–Lisgar 91,019  62,153  41,187  66.3% 
AB 48024 Grande Prairie–Mackenzie 106,738  80,511  53,343  66.3% 
ON 35100 Simcoe North 108,672  86,208  57,071  66.2% 
QC 24051 Montmagny–L'Islet–Kamouraska–Rivière-du-Loup 101,258  74,374  49,201  66.2% 
ON 35047 Kitchener South–Hespeler 97,673  72,359  47,829  66.1% 
MB 46005 Elmwood–Transcona 85,906  65,207  43,086  66.1% 
QC 24032 Jonquière 87,596  72,802  48,103  66.1% 
ON 35002 Algoma–Manitoulin–Kapuskasing 79,801  62,625  41,374  66.1% 
QC 24020 Beauport-Côte-de-Beaupré-Île d'Orléans-Charlevoix 92,496  76,452  50,456  66.0% 
AB 48027 Medicine Hat–Cardston–Warner 102,847  76,789  50,650  66.0% 
QC 24031 Joliette 100,683  85,981  56,689  65.9% 
ON 35026 Essex 120,477  91,816  60,531  65.9% 
SK 47012 Saskatoon West 76,257  57,274  37,715  65.9% 
MB 46004 Dauphin–Swan River–Neepawa 87,374  63,187  41,598  65.8% 
ON 35037 Hamilton Mountain 103,615  76,886  50,554  65.8% 
QC 24022 Chicoutimi–Le Fjord 81,501  66,639  43,805  65.7% 
ON 35013 Brantford–Brant 132,443  96,290  63,272  65.7% 
AB 48028 Peace River–Westlock 108,095  75,362  49,519  65.7% 
QC 24012 Berthier–Maskinongé 98,590  82,803  54,406  65.7% 
ON 35010 Brampton North 111,951  73,321  48,166  65.7% 
ON 35017 Chatham-Kent–Leamington 111,866  79,160  51,971  65.7% 
BC 59012 Fleetwood–Port Kells 109,742  74,286  48,763  65.6% 
ON 35095 Scarborough–Guildwood 101,914  63,885  41,917  65.6% 
QC 24029 Honoré-Mercier 102,587  78,744  51,658  65.6% 
ON 35022 Dufferin–Caledon 116,341  92,461  60,451  65.4% 
QC 24033 La Pointe-de-l'Île 103,512  84,507  55,226  65.4% 
QC 24007 Beauce 106,337  85,547  55,882  65.3% 
QC 24005 Argenteuil–La Petite-Nation 94,208  78,626  51,066  64.9% 
QC 24062 Rivière-des-Mille-Îles 102,085  89,381  58,046  64.9% 
QC 24040 Laval–Les Îles 104,895  83,719  54,205  64.7% 
ON 35003 Aurora–Oak Ridges–Richmond Hill 106,064  78,848  50,980  64.7% 
QC 24035 Lac-Saint-Jean 108,795  85,727  55,279  64.5% 
NT 61001 Northwest Territories 41,462  29,432  18,961  64.4% 
ON 35043 King–Vaughan 109,235  84,925  54,686  64.4% 
QC 24008 Beauport–Limoilou 92,944  78,530  50,558  64.4% 
ON 35016 Cambridge 111,693  82,916  53,339  64.3% 
ON 35004 Barrie–Innisfil 101,584  76,831  49,341  64.2% 
QC 24018 Rimouski-Neigette–Témiscouata–Les Basques 84,809  70,079  44,946  64.1% 
QC 24075 Terrebonne 108,774  90,900  58,284  64.1% 
ON 35111 Vaughan–Woodbridge 105,450  73,924  47,298  64.0% 
QC 24025 Drummond 98,681  81,303  51,979  63.9% 
QC 24070 Saint-Maurice–Champlain 107,036  92,280  58,947  63.9% 
ON 35051 London–Fanshawe 119,334  85,788  54,745  63.8% 
QC 24024 Dorval–Lachine–LaSalle 106,886  85,587  54,605  63.8% 
ON 35094 Scarborough Centre 108,826  70,594  45,029  63.8% 
BC 59038 Vancouver Kingsway 102,003  71,206  45,396  63.8% 
MB 46003 Churchill–Keewatinook Aski 85,148  49,036  31,254  63.7% 
QC 24078 Vimy 105,783  85,337  54,343  63.7% 
BC 59040 Vancouver South 100,966  70,062  44,611  63.7% 
ON 35020 Don Valley North 103,073  71,812  45,687  63.6% 
ON 35059 Mississauga East–Cooksville 121,792  81,736  51,917  63.5% 
ON 35074 Oshawa 125,771  95,561  60,686  63.5% 
ON 35119 York–Simcoe 94,616  75,570  47,879  63.4% 
QC 24073 Sherbrooke 111,905  90,607  57,300  63.2% 
ON 35067 Niagara Falls 128,357  102,602  64,711  63.1% 
ON 35011 Brampton South 107,364  72,111  45,464  63.0% 
ON 35058 Mississauga Centre 118,756  82,443  51,852  62.9% 
ON 35036 Hamilton East–Stoney Creek 107,786  80,042  50,332  62.9% 
QC 24028 Hochelaga 103,436  82,783  51,873  62.7% 
NL 10004 Labrador 26,728  19,917  12,373  62.1% 
ON 35120 York South–Weston 116,606  70,361  43,706  62.1% 
NL 10001 Avalon 81,540  67,781  42,086  62.1% 
AB 48023 Fort McMurray–Cold Lake 101,538  76,190  47,266  62.0% 
NV 62001 Nunavut 31,906  19,223  11,910  62.0% 
ON 35029 Etobicoke North 117,601  68,063  42,064  61.8% 
QC 24066 Saint-Hyacinthe–Bagot 108,244  88,414  54,369  61.5% 
ON 35116 Windsor–Tecumseh 115,528  86,864  53,344  61.4% 
ON 35107 Timmins–James Bay 83,104  60,692  37,271  61.4% 
ON 35012 Brampton West 101,762  70,734  43,398  61.4% 
ON 35008 Brampton Centre 103,122  64,640  39,632  61.3% 
BC 59032 Surrey Centre 111,486  70,493  43,198  61.3% 
AB 48016 Edmonton Manning 106,262  80,111  49,001  61.2% 
ON 35115 Willowdale 109,680  75,172  45,953  61.1% 
AB 48013 Calgary Skyview 110,189  73,643  44,993  61.1% 
ON 35087 Richmond Hill 108,658  80,402  49,113  61.1% 
BC 59003 Burnaby South 105,037  75,263  45,887  61.0% 
MB 46011 Winnipeg Centre 82,026  55,633  33,885  60.9% 
ON 35055 Markham–Thornhill 102,221  70,484  42,857  60.8% 
ON 35096 Scarborough North 101,080  64,827  39,188  60.5% 
BC 59031 Steveston–Richmond East 96,610  71,526  43,225  60.4% 
ON 35056 Markham–Unionville 104,693  82,534  49,839  60.4% 
QC 24026 Gaspésie–Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine 78,833  65,623  39,617  60.4% 
QC 24052 Mount Royal 104,410  79,597  48,051  60.4% 
ON 35035 Hamilton Centre 101,932  68,087  41,083  60.3% 
QC 24002 Abitibi–Témiscamingue 102,794  82,839  49,729  60.0% 
AB 48015 Edmonton Griesbach 107,809  79,980  47,942  59.9% 
QC 24006 Avignon–La Mitis–Matane–Matapédia 74,547  60,801  36,356  59.8% 
QC 24055 Papineau 108,740  85,216  50,770  59.6% 
ON 35093 Scarborough–Agincourt 104,499  69,888  41,556  59.5% 
ON 35062 Mississauga–Malton 118,046  74,448  44,256  59.4% 
QC 24041 Longueuil–Charles-LeMoyne 107,593  87,103  51,707  59.4% 
MB 46012 Winnipeg North 88,616  57,627  33,964  58.9% 
NL 10005 Long Range Mountains 87,592  71,037  41,824  58.9% 
QC 24046 Manicouagan 88,745  71,469  42,030  58.8% 
ON 35121 Humber River–Black Creek 108,198  60,994  35,859  58.8% 
QC 24059 Québec 111,191  91,986  53,867  58.6% 
QC 24077 Ville-Marie–Le Sud-Ouest–Île-des-Soeurs 104,373  85,889  50,164  58.4% 
QC 24015 Bourassa 100,286  70,815  41,129  58.1% 
BC 59025 Richmond Centre 93,863  68,991  39,862  57.8% 
NL 10002 Bonavista–Burin–Trinity 76,704  61,475  35,092  57.1% 
QC 24037 LaSalle–Émard–Verdun 111,357  96,737  53,763  55.6% 
NL 10003 Coast of Bays–Central–Notre Dame 78,092  63,891  35,448  55.5% 
QC 24054 Outremont 108,977  78,649  43,619  55.5% 
ON 35117 Windsor West 118,973  84,699  46,905  55.4% 
AB 48006 Calgary Forest Lawn 108,251  74,620  41,047  55.0% 
QC 24001 Abitibi–Baie-James–Nunavik–Eeyou 85,475  63,226  34,518  54.6% 
QC 24047 Mégantic–L'Érable 103,536  87,622  47,287  54.0% 
QC 24068 Saint-Laurent 110,649  76,531  40,330  52.7% 
QC 24069 Saint-Léonard–Saint-Michel 110,273  92,086  44,531  48.4% 

Elections Canada does not provide a table with the participation rates by riding. Instead, I have scraped the population and electors figures from their election-night web site. If you would like to use the data for your own research, I am providing the 2015 Federal Election Participation Data on this web site as a CSV file.

Posted on Monday, November 2, 2015 at 17:30 — #Politics
[print]
© 2018  Prof. Werner Antweiler, University of British Columbia. Contact me at: werner.antweiler@ubc.ca | valid HTML | Home
[Sauder School of Business] [The University of British Columbia]